Official Irish Government Cast Iron Harp

Official Irish Government Cast Iron Harp. 

Usually only seen at official Irish Political & State Buildings. 

Dimensions: 11 inches X 9 inches.

Add the official stamp of Ireland to your home, den or business.  

The Harp   

 

The harp has been used as a symbol of Ireland and Irish Nationalism for centuries. Its origin is from the time of Brian Boru, a famous 'High King' of the whole island of Ireland who played the harp.

 

In Celtic society every clan would have a resident harp player who would write songs in honour of the leader. These were called Planxties. This evolved and would eventually be adapted as a symbol and representation of the Irish people, and under English occupation.  The period starting from the 1600s during English rule in Ireland was difficult for Irish harpers as the harp as a folk and court instrument was suppressed to prevent a resurgence of nationalism.  Harps were burnt and harpers executed.

 

  From 1922, the Irish Free State continued to use a similar harp, facing left, as its state symbol on the Great Seal of the Irish Free State, featuring it both on the coat of arms and on the Presidential Standard and Presidential Seal - as well as on various other official seals and documents.

 

The harp is also used extensively as a corporate logo - both private and government organisations. For instance; Ireland's most famous drink, Guinness, also uses a harp. It was adopted on Guinness products in Ireland from the 1890s, to remind supporters of the growing nationalist movement that Guinness was Irish.


Official Irish Government Cast Iron Harp. 

Usually only seen at official Irish Political & State Buildings. 

Dimensions: 11 inches X 9 inches.

Add the official stamp of Ireland to your home, den or business.  

The Harp   

 

The harp has been used as a symbol of Ireland and Irish Nationalism for centuries. Its origin is from the time of Brian Boru, a famous 'High King' of the whole island of Ireland who played the harp.

 

In Celtic society every clan would have a resident harp player who would write songs in honour of the leader. These were called Planxties. This evolved and would eventually be adapted as a symbol and representation of the Irish people, and under English occupation.  The period starting from the 1600s during English rule in Ireland was difficult for Irish harpers as the harp as a folk and court instrument was suppressed to prevent a resurgence of nationalism.  Harps were burnt and harpers executed.

 

  From 1922, the Irish Free State continued to use a similar harp, facing left, as its state symbol on the Great Seal of the Irish Free State, featuring it both on the coat of arms and on the Presidential Standard and Presidential Seal - as well as on various other official seals and documents.

 

The harp is also used extensively as a corporate logo - both private and government organisations. For instance; Ireland's most famous drink, Guinness, also uses a harp. It was adopted on Guinness products in Ireland from the 1890s, to remind supporters of the growing nationalist movement that Guinness was Irish.


€79.00

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