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1916 Rising poem written in Lewes Jail, England by Irish Republican Prisoner

1916 Easter Rising poem written in Lewes Jail, England by Irish Republican Prisoner. 

Lewes jail held some notable Irish rebels including Harry Boland (1887 - 1922), Thomas Ashe (1885 - 1917) who led a Hunger Strike in Lewes prison, Frank Lawless (1871 - 1922) who was second in command to Thomas Ashe during the Rising, future President of Ireland Éamon de Valera (1882 - 1975) and many more.

With the entry of the USA into World War One in April 1917, the British Government were put under pressure to deal with its Irish Prisoners. This pressure came from the United States as they had American passport holder De Valera in prison. England found it hard to go to War with the Americans while having De Valera and other Irish imprisoned. There was also added pressure due to reports of mistreatment in the Irish press. On the 18th of June 1917, the prisoners were released by Lloyd George as part of a General Amnesty.


We are delighted to present these fascinating rarities of old Ireland for you to own. We look forward to helping you create your own collection that can be treasured and admired by your family for many generations to come. 

Dimensions: 16” X 10” approx. 

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1916 Easter Rising poem written in Lewes Jail, England by Irish Republican Prisoner. 

Lewes jail held some notable Irish rebels including Harry Boland (1887 - 1922), Thomas Ashe (1885 - 1917) who led a Hunger Strike in Lewes prison, Frank Lawless (1871 - 1922) who was second in command to Thomas Ashe during the Rising, future President of Ireland Éamon de Valera (1882 - 1975) and many more.

With the entry of the USA into World War One in April 1917, the British Government were put under pressure to deal with its Irish Prisoners. This pressure came from the United States as they had American passport holder De Valera in prison. England found it hard to go to War with the Americans while having De Valera and other Irish imprisoned. There was also added pressure due to reports of mistreatment in the Irish press. On the 18th of June 1917, the prisoners were released by Lloyd George as part of a General Amnesty.


We are delighted to present these fascinating rarities of old Ireland for you to own. We look forward to helping you create your own collection that can be treasured and admired by your family for many generations to come. 

Dimensions: 16” X 10” approx.