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GAA Bloody Sunday Tribute, Croke Park, Hogan Stand Opening 1959

Announcement of the official opening of the 'Hogan Stand' on 7th June, 1959 at Croke Park, Dublin. 

The Hogan Stand was named after Michael Hogan, the Tipperary player shot dead by the British Army on what became known as Bloody Sunday on 21st November, 1920. 

The story of Michael Hogan will continue to be told as long as the Irish heart shall beat. The young footballer's life came to an abrupt end on the field of play in Croke Park. Michael Hogan's was the fullback position and the man from Grangemockler was a dab hand at stopping the ball. Little did he know that it would be a bullet he would be stopping on this day.

It was 3.15pm when referee Mick Sammon threw in the ball and in less than 5 minutes British forces stormed the field and started firing into the penned crowd indiscriminately for 90 seconds. Fourteen civilians died in Croke Park that day including player Michael Hogan. 70 civilians were injured including Thomas Ryan who was shot as he whispered an act of contrition to the dying Hogan.

This poignant piece features the four provinces of Ireland on each corner and the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) symbol in the middle.

We are delighted to present these fascinating rarities of old Ireland for you to own.  

We look forward to helping you create your own collection that can be treasured and admired by your family for many generations to come!

Dimensions: 16” X 10” approx

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Announcement of the official opening of the 'Hogan Stand' on 7th June, 1959 at Croke Park, Dublin. 

The Hogan Stand was named after Michael Hogan, the Tipperary player shot dead by the British Army on what became known as Bloody Sunday on 21st November, 1920. 

The story of Michael Hogan will continue to be told as long as the Irish heart shall beat. The young footballer's life came to an abrupt end on the field of play in Croke Park. Michael Hogan's was the fullback position and the man from Grangemockler was a dab hand at stopping the ball. Little did he know that it would be a bullet he would be stopping on this day.

It was 3.15pm when referee Mick Sammon threw in the ball and in less than 5 minutes British forces stormed the field and started firing into the penned crowd indiscriminately for 90 seconds. Fourteen civilians died in Croke Park that day including player Michael Hogan. 70 civilians were injured including Thomas Ryan who was shot as he whispered an act of contrition to the dying Hogan.

This poignant piece features the four provinces of Ireland on each corner and the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) symbol in the middle.

We are delighted to present these fascinating rarities of old Ireland for you to own.  

We look forward to helping you create your own collection that can be treasured and admired by your family for many generations to come!

Dimensions: 16” X 10” approx